Chinoiserie [shēn-ˈwäz-rē]

Chinoiserie [shēn-ˈwäz-rē]

March 17, 2019

During the 18th century, European trade with the Far East, inspired artists to use themes found in everyday Chinese life and apply them to the decorative arts. Subjects such as flowers, vines, pagodas and long-tailed birds were used to create patterns that celebrated the fascination of a faraway land. The word Chinoiserie was used to describe the patterns based on this style. Originally developed by French artists these wonderful patterns remain ever popular in today's decor. 

The featured fabric in the Dixie & Grace Le Jardín Collection is used for the accent pillow and is a Chinoiserie by GP & Baker.  This fabric can be used to upholster a headboard or become a bedskirt or drapery [Inquire at D&G].  What seems like an ordinary palm print becomes something more majestic when it is from an antique English Botanical and presented in a hand-made 18k gold frame offering a beautiful and historical presence to your space.

 

The Chinoiserie pattern is such a part of the interior design world and an abundance of inspiration can be found online and in books. 

To explore a more in depth analysis of how art and culture influences design and the decorative arts in eighteenth-century Britain see: Chinoiserie: Commerce and critical ornament in eighteenth-century Britain by Stacey Sloboda

Here are a few of my favorite wall covering installations from de Gournay used by designers all over the world. Visit their site for further inspiration and the interior design firms that created these beautiful spaces.



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